Fast Company on WNYC's Storytelling Experiments

Fast Company writer John Paul Titlow did a great job capturing the spirit of experimentation at WNYC -- and me doing an ill-advised live demo on stage:

"Anyone who thinks old-school media can't be stealthy and innovative has never seen John Keefe text a room full of people from a command line on his laptop. But tonight, the senior editor for data news at WNYC—a public radio station founded in 1924—is showing off some things he built to help his colleagues tell stories."

Read the whole story here.

Alexa Baked in a Pi

You can put Alexa in a Raspberry Pi, and that is pretty cool.

Alexa is Amazon's intelligent agent, like Siri for your living room. Standing nearby, you speak to it with a question or a command, and it responds verbally.

Normally Alexa lives inside a $180 device called an Amazon Echo, or the new $50 Echo Dot. But Emily Withrow at Northwestern University's KnightLab told me it was possible to put the Alexa code inside a cheap Raspberry Pi hobby computer. And I happened to have an old Pi lying around.

So I gave it a whirl!

Now Available: Family Projects for Smart Objects!

It exists! I can't believe it!

My first book, Family Projects for Smart Objects: Tabletop Projects That Respond to Your World is in my hands. The Kindle edition is available now, and Amazon is taking preorders for the paperback edition that comes out September 24, 2016. 

It's a collection of 11 projects designed to introduce beginners to Arduinos, sensors and "internet of things" things. I tried to make it as accessible as possible, with clear instructions intended for girls, boys, women and men who have never done anything like this before.

The book grew out of my attempt to make something every week for a year (and blog about it).

Other fun facts:

  • I wrote much of it on my phone riding the NYC subway to work.
  • I promised myself I'd never write a book (thanks to Quinn Heraty for talking me into it).
  • It's published by the folks who make Make Magazine.

If you're into making and live in the NYC area, come out to the World Maker Faire October 1-2. I'll be there both days, demonstrating some projects and talking about the book!

"Family Projects for Smart Objects" at the World Maker Faire, NY Hall of Science:

Saturday, October 1, 2016 at 2:45 p.m. — Zone 3 Make: Show & Tell Stage

Sunday, October 2, 2016 at 11 a.m. — Zone 3 Make: Show & Tell Stage

C'mon out!



Tracking Harlem's Heat with Sensor Journalism

harlem_heat_ba_Credit-JohnKeefe-WNYC

How hot is a Harlem apartment?

We're trying to find out.

There are now DIY sensors in about 20 apartments, measuring the indoor heat and humidity -- in the middle of a heat wave.

It's the latest sensor journalism project from WNYC's Data News Team, in a collaboration with blog AdaptNY, community group WEACT and observation platform ISeeChange

And this week we worked with maker space HackManhattan, which hosted a soldering party to build more sensors.

Book Making: Done

Between the last post and this one, I made a book!

Family Projects for Smart Objects is a collection of 11 projects based on Arduino hobby computers. They’re DIY activities designed for beginners who want to learn about sensors and make “Internet of Things” things.

Or just make stuff with people you love.

The book is currently with a team of designers who are working to make it beautiful, useful and fun.

Game plan is to publish in time for the World Maker Faire in New York this fall. If you’d like a note when it’s published, just jump onto my mailing list.

Ridiculously, that’s not all I’ve been doing. More posts ahead about cool (and hot) things I’m exploring at work and on the side.



Adventures in Minecraft & Parenting

When it comes to screen time, there are two activities where we give our daughters a lot of latitude: coding and Minecraft.

This morning I published a post on Medium called "Gardening at Night: One Dad's Guide to Minecraft." It's something I've been noodling on for a while, inspired by my daughters and by a few other parents who wanted to know how our family got started with the game.

Please let me know if it's useful to you or anyone else you know!

Separately, I've been collaborating with Jodi Jefferson to create a meetup geared for girls who play Minecraft called Girls Who Mine. We've met a couple of times, and are making it public with an event we're crafting for January. If you're interested, and live in the New York City area, jump over and add your name to the mailing list. We'll keep you posted.


Make Every Week: Programs in Python

“Daddy, I want to learn Python,” announced my 12-year-old daughter a couple of weeks ago. Boys in her youth group know it, she said. She wanted to, too.

Say no more.

I’ve introduced my daughters to a variety of friendly programming platforms, including Kids Ruby, Hopscotch, Codea and Lua in Minecraft. They’ve sweetly tolerated my programatic prodding. This was the first direct request.

I quickly ordered two paper copies of “Learn Python the Hard Way,” by Zed A Shaw, and we’ve been walking through each lesson together — one every week.